Last month we read about Natalie and Krisztina who originally met in London but after they got married they moved to a small oceanside town in the South of England. Let us continue with Yifat whose job also brought her to the English metropolis but she lived most of her life in Israel. She will tell us about intriguing Tel Aviv, a well-known gay haven in the middle of a rather conservative country.

 

Thanks for saying yes to the interview, Yifat. Can you introduce yourself please?

I am Yifat, originally from Tel Aviv, Israel. I moved a few months ago to London, UK. I am a UX/UI product designer, currently working in a tech company. I love everything that relates to graphic design, apps and web products. I spend my days between friends, movies, Netflix, exhibitions and meetups. I am going to “Lesbians who tech” meetups, and a lot of cultural activities in Tel Aviv and London, such as summits, festivals and gay prides. I still think that they are important to our community.

 

I cannot agree more. Now let’s see how things are in your home country, Israel. How would you summarize the general situation of the LGBTQ+ community over there?

First of all, Tel Aviv, the second biggest country is a very pro LGBT+ city. Many LGBT people live there, even families. We are accepted as equal in work, schools and all institutions. The night life offers a lot of options to the LGBT+ in general and for Lesbians* in particular. Altogether, the life of the LGBT+ in Tel Aviv is very open since this city is very gay friendly and liberal. As for the rest of the country and the government, the situation is very different. Since Israel is becoming more and more religious and primitive, they don't accept same sex marriage, we can't adopt children from Israel, just outside of the country which cost a lot of money, we don't have the same benefits as a straight couple. The government discriminates us on a regular basis.  

I see, then let us focus on Tel Aviv. Can you say a couple of words about lesbian* social life in your city?

There are bars and parties for lesbians* on a regular basis; moreover, I know of film festivals, art exhibitions, cultural events, music shows, meetups for lesbians in tech and more. LGBT Pride is once a year in July and it is a huge deal. Tel Aviv gives a lot of value to the lesbian* community and I am happy to be a part of this city and the lesbian* community.

 

I am happy to hear. Now can you share a memorable coming out stories of yours with the Hungarian community?

I had a friend in high school, we both dated boys back than. We lost touch after finishing school. We met after a few years at a goodbye party to another friend who left to live in Berlin. We talked and realised we were both lesbians. We became good friends and even moved to the same neighbourhood to be close to one another. She is my inspiration to everything I do. Thanks to her my life as a lesbian became easier, and fun, full of good memories. I am so happy and thankful she is in my life. For me, she represents the power we have as proud and powerful lesbians. And no, we didn't sleep together.  

How did you know I was about to ask this? Thanks, Yifat.

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