Of course, we hear a lot of stories when LGBTQ+ people become embarrassed when they have to come out. But there are situations in which we are the confident ones, and the person we are coming out to becomes embarrassed. Dóri’s story shows us one of these peculiar situations.

I’d like to tell you a funny and spontaneous coming out story that happened to me and my girlfriend. My girlfriend’s colleague, Péter, is a cool, young, outspoken guy. He asked my girlfriend at their workplace:

- Is your man picking you up?
- Yes, but not my man.
- Ok, whatever, whoever is banging you.

My girlfriend thought that it was a legit formulation, so she replied:

- Yeah, my person is coming.
- Cool, then can you give me a ride to the tram station?
- Yes, sure.

I was standing outside next to the car. My girlfriend and Péter were getting closer. Péter was looking in front of me, behind me, next to me, but there was no other car around. We met, Péter was very confused. My girlfriend introduced me as her partner, Péter was stammering, he was so embarrassed that he wanted to get in the car on the wrong side, and then he compulsively babbled until we got to the tram station.

So coming out will always be part of one’s life, and once they enter a new environment and meet new people, they start from scratch. But the initially trembling voice will be gone when you are telling for the thirtieth time “what’s up with you”, and this coolness makes this thing less newsworthy. If it is natural for us, there is a good chance that it will be natural for others. Unless when it’s a different case. 🙂

Dóri

 

Translated by Blanka Barabás

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